Image for post
Image for post
Gerardo Ordás García | Data & Analytics Manager | everis Spain

Breaking Visualization Barriers

Those of us who have worked for a few years in the data treatment world have seen how the technological leap provided by the digital revolution is also causing a radical evolution in the way people consume information.

Image for post
Image for post

We have trailed a long path since the dot matrix printers provided us with report sheets, and delighted us with sonic harmonies that are part of the soundtrack of our lives, along with the beeps of our long missed 14.4k modem. Now, we live in a world where the use of information takes place in increasingly different ways, including the displays of our devices, gestural interactions, the use of natural language and the advent of something that has haunted us since early science fiction movies: Virtual Reality.

Visual experience is key for understanding the world that surrounds us

Image for post
Image for post

Thus, our path previously limited by two dimensions, has arrived at a fork in the road. The variety of options requires us to go beyond the ubiquitous Dashboards in major company departments, which forces us to become more creative and innovative, focusing not only on the analysis of the past and the prediction of the future, but also on the multitude of forms that render the understanding of this information simpler, more agile and more accessible.

Do you remember when you used to say with a stern face, “This feature does not exist in this tool”? Those days are over.

Image for post
Image for post

The constant evolution of market tools allows us to increase their visual capacities as much as our imagination allows us to. For instance, the advent of JavaScript libraries, such as D3, offers an infinite world of graphics adapted to business needs. The expansion, through extensions, of Visualization tool features, makes us become architects of said tools, becoming an intrinsical part of their development, no longer being distant from these tools’ development cycles.

We no longer request new characteristics for tools: we develop them

Likewise, the need to gather thousands of records in real time and make them understandable forces us to explore new ways to display them: graphs, log monitoring, sensor reading, etc. We are in a universe that requires technological specialziation, opening the frontier of coding in the visual layer, and where Visualization equipment is no longer defined as mere “painting” tools.

The advent of new interfaces, such as Virtual Reality goggles or Voice Assistants, offers use cases that are linked to business needs, introducing these capacities within the analysis cycle and converting them into a productive technological element, and not just something to be amused with.

Image for post
Image for post

Change in the access of information, along with new capacities also forces us to face multiple development layers, which were previously seen as isolated or sequential elements. Visualization is no longer the domain of a single tool, it mingles with architecture for data storage and treatment, with analytics that can exploit “what could be,” and with interaction and access to the most varied sources, from social networks to handwritten paper. Ultimately, exceeding the given framework and building access modes that are customized to the needs of the business. Our teams receive graphic designers, data scientists, web developers, and linguists, mingling multiple areas of knowledge and talents to adapt reality and make it more accessible, which enables us to display and exploit what has been called the “new oil” of our time: data.

Exponential intelligence for exponential companies

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store